We are about to find out a whole lot more about UNT’s hoops future

The big day has arrived.

The late signing period for men’s basketball is upon us.

Basketball is a little different than football when it comes to signing day. Football is a one-and-done affair. Everyone makes their class official in February and that is pretty much it (except for the mid-term period for JUCO transfers).

There is any early period in basketball, then the late period. Signings and commitments trickle in throughout the year.

That is what makes today so interesting for UNT.

It really feels like how UNT does today (or the next several days) could greatly affect this team’s future.

UNT signed three players in the early period. One was a steal in Greg Wesley, a small forward ranked among the top 30 players in the state, one was a bit of a mystery in Tony Nunn, a prep school center from the East Coast, and one seems like a project in Josh Friar, an in-state power forward with a Big 12 set of physical skills who came off the bench for his high school team.

Those guys will help, especially Wesley, but UNT needs help — quite possibly a lot of help — to go along with those guys.

UNT has one guy over 6-foot-6 returning in center Keith Coleman, who was a bit player last year.

UNT head coach Tony Benford said yesterday he wants to spread the floor with shooters. The return of Brandan Walton from a broken foot will help — a lot.

With that being said, UNT isn’t going anywhere without some help under the basket and it seems like a huge risk to depend on Nunn and Friar to help provide it.

A couple of key additions would huge, especially if they are, well, huge.

UNT’s fan base needs a reason to get excited again after the huge letdown that last season turned into and the departure of Tony Mitchell to the NBA. Wesley’s a good start, but it’s going to take more to get the bandwagon rolling again.

We are about to find out if UNT will land a few more players who can give it more than a nudge.

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