Looking back on the school year Part III

North Texas athletic director Rick Villarreal speaks during a press conference announcing the school's move to Conference USA. The excitement surrounding the move was a highlight of the school year for UNT. (Denton Record-Chronicle/David Minton)

One of the interesting aspects of looking back at the school year that was in UNT athletics, is that most Mean Green coaches, administrators and fans spent it looking forward.

UNT will play its first season in Conference USA this fall.

The move from the Sun Belt to C-USA is arguably one of the biggest stories in UNT athletics in years.

We can argue all day about just how much better C-USA is compared to the Sun Belt. The Sun Belt had a great year last year and is getting better. And granted, C-USA is losing some good schools like Tulsa and Tulane. Houston and SMU are also gone. Realistically, SMU leaving likely opened the door for UNT.

The bottom line is that for UNT, C-USA will be a huge boost. The competition will be better, there will be more opportunities for bowl games and higher revenue. Most importantly, UNT will be able to play Texas rivals UTEP, UTSA and Rice every year.

Texas is a little like a separate country. Games against Texas teams just draw more interest.

UNT will be more visible, which will be a boon for the program.

Every reasonable UNT fan knows it and spent the school year talking about it while the school prepared to move leagues.

When one thinks about highlights of a school year, it’s usually conference titles, NCAA bids and bowl games that come to mind. The general excitement about the future was something that carried UNT through the year and was definitely a high point for the program.

Here’s our list:

The Good
1. A solid year across the board in Olympic sports
2. The excitement surrounding UNT’s move to C-USA

The Bad
1. Failing to break through as a team at the NCAA level

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