UNT checks in at No. 95 in CBS’s list of top college programs

North Texas quarterback Derek Thompson accepts the MVP trophy following the Mean Green's win over UNLV in the Heart of Dallas Bowl. UNT picked up 75 points in the CBS Best in College Sports standings for its performance in football (DRC file photo)

UNT recently landed in a tie for No. 236 nationally in the Division I Learfield Sports Directors’ Cup stands that rate all the Division I athletic programs across the land for their performance on a national level.

We mentioned the rankings a while back in our three-part series on UNT’s first year in Conference USA.

CBS followed with its own rankings, which are based on the idea that it’s a stupid idea to have a school’s finish in football carry the same weight as its finish in women’s golf.

Thus CBS created a system that is based on a school’s finish in football, men’s basketball, women’s basketball and baseball with football and men’s basketball carrying the most weight of the four.

There was also a wildcard spot for a school’s best performance on a national level in any other sport.

So how did UNT fare?

Not all that bad.

UNT checked in at No. 95 in a tie with rival UTSA and Marshall with 75 points. UNT finished in front of SMU, Louisiana Tech and Florida International (that’s good), but also finished behind Middle Tennessee, Rice and Arkansas State (that’s not good).

UNT had a tough year in basketball, so it didn’t score there. What also hurt was coming up empty in the wildcard sport. UNT was really, really good in the Olympic sports like soccer and track in the Sun Belt. That success carried over in a few sports in Conference USA, but UNT came up just short of winning the C-USA soccer tournament title, falling in the final to Colorado College. Scoring a few points in the wildcard spot would have pushed UNT up a little.

Be sure to check out the rankings.

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