A look at UNT’s quarterback options

I fully expect there a plume of smoke to rise from the Mean Green Athletic Center some time in the next couple of days.

Will UNT’s coaches choose Josh Greer as their starting quarterback or go with Andrew McNulty?

It’s hard to say where things stand because practice is closed and UNT’s coaches have declined to give any kind of indication of where they are leaning, at least not blatantly.

My gut feeling is that UNT is going to go with Greer. No inside information. Just a feeling.

So what does UNT get with Greer?

Greer

For one, it would give the Mean Green a prototypical 6-foot-5 guy who has shown that he can be accurate with the ball and also has good running ability for a guy his size.

UNT offensive coordinator Mike Canales liked Greer all the way back when he was in high school. Greer was at Dan McCarney’s first spring practice at UNT. For some reason, UNT didn’t end up landing Greer, who ended up at UAB, left and then spent one productive season at Navarro.

Greer threw for 1,205 yards in just six games in JC and led Navarro to the SWJCFC title.

Greer can play. He just hasn’t played a ton on the college level. Plus he’s only been at UNT a couple of months after enrolling in January.

My suspicion is that he is more of what Canales wants in a quarterback. He’s Chico’s guy. Canales recruited him — twice. Once out of high school and once out of junior college.

What about McNulty?

McNulty

The edge McNulty has is experience in UNT’s system. The Iowa native is heading into his fourth season at UNT, has started once and served as the Mean Green’s primary backup for years now.

McNulty is 6-foot-1, so he’s smaller than Greer, but he does have some ability as a runner. UNT rolled him out there in 2011 against Houston and watched him score the first touchdown in Apogee Stadium history.

The question now is whether that little fact makes him a footnote in UNT history.

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